A list of weird Finnish words which for one reason or another I’ve only just come across.  I’ll keep adding to the list as time goes by ..

Aivopieru – Brain fart.  A singularly stupid and fundamentally flawed idea which really should have been kept inside. (21.01.2015)

Hanki – Snow*.  The covering of snow on the ground, from the dirt to the surface.  It can be quite deep.  (24.02.15)

Hyttynen – Mosquito.

1)  A small flying insect which only emerges in the spring or summer, and is not seen in bad weather.  A sudden cloud of them can be a pain for a cyclist who has to swerve suddenly to avoid them.  There is nothing more annoying than when one suddenly flies past you and is hard to catch.  Usage: It must be spring.  The paths/bike sheds/changing rooms/showers are full of mosquitoes.

2)  A derogatory term used by smug year-round-all-weather cyclists about the cyclists who only come out in the spring or summer, and are not seen in bad weather.  A cloud of them can be a pain for the cyclist who has to swerve suddenly to avoid them.  There is nothing more annoying then when one suddenly flies past you and is hard to catch.  Usage: It must be spring.  The paths/bike sheds/changing rooms/showers are full of mosquitoes.

(Colloq. Metcalfe 03.2015)

Kanatava – Chickenable.  I made this word up myself.  Only funny if you read the next entry first.  Alphabetical order can be a bit of a kill joy sometimes.  (19.11.2015)

Kannattava – Worthwhile, not worthwhile, to support.  Go figure.  A longer explanation would be, “Kannattaa korjaa – worthwhile repairing”, “Ei kannataa korjaa – not worth fixing”.  (19.11.2015)

Kannettava – Portatable, laptop. “On kannattava korjata kanatava kannettava – it’s worthwhile to repair the chickenable laptop”.  Yeah.  I know.  (19.11.2015)

Kännättävä – “On kännättävä – it’s necessary/important/required to get drunk.” (with thanks to Esko: 19.11.2015)

Luultavasti – Presumably / like as not.  It’s seems linked to ‘luulla – to think’.  In use ‘luulla’ becomes something like ‘luulen – I think/reckon’.  The ‘ulta’ without that ‘e’ is really doing my head in. (27.01.2015)

Lyödään lukkoon – When I first read this I thought it meant “Let’s beat this into a lock”.  The correct meaning would probably be something like “Let’s lock this in place.”.  I first came across this when agreeing a time to meet someone.  Usage: Lyödään lukkoon nuo ajat – Let’s agree to meet at those times.  (17.03.2015)

Nuoska – Snow*.  The kind of snow which is perfect for snowballs. (24.02.15)

Pulisonki – Sideburn.  A strip of vertical hair on a man’s face to keep the wind out his ears.  Doesn’t work. (20.01.2015)

Pökköä pesään – Used when encouraging someone to accelerate their car in a carefree and cavalier fashion, or when complaining the fire is going out and another log is needed.  The closest translation I can figure out is ‘give it some (welly)!’.  Seems to have it’s origins in the days of steam locomotion.  Edited 31.01.2015 with thanks to Esko. (30.01.2015)

Soinen – Boggy.  This one shows off Finnish grammar at it’s very best worst.  If something is of a type of .. thing, then “lainen” is sort of jammed on the end.  Suomi (Finland) -> Suomalainen (Finnish).  You can see Grammar trying to happen there too .. I was at a Sauna and the guys were saying the lake is very boggy.  The word for bog is “Suo”.  The word for boggey is not, as it seems “suolainen”, because that means salty.  I was stood there going through all the permutations of “Suo” I could think of, suo-rinen, suo-lainen, suoooolinen, suo-sti .. after a few painful moments one of the guys offered “Soinen” to put us all out of our various miseries.  Where did the “u” go to?? (02.05.2015)

Vertahyytävä – Blood-curding.  It’s kinda twisted, but this word feels quite satisfying to say.  Feels like it should be a cuss word, but obviously you are gonna get some weird looks if you suddenly shout it out.  One of the first words I learned.  Don’t ask the context, it was years ago. (08.1998)

Vetää herne nenään – To pull a pea through your nose.  What something annoying and offensive does to you.  The comparable pain and discomfort of, well, having a pea pulled out of your nose. Usage: “Se veti herneet nenään” meaning “He got pissed off”!  (Corrected: thanks, Juha!) (circ: 2012)

Viti – Snow*.  Freshly fallen powdery snow. (24.02.15)

* There are whole load of words for snow in the Finnish language.  Fairly comprehensive list here.